Tag Archives: Movies

19 Things About Star Wars

14 Sep

Never has a movie franchise affected popular culture as much as Star Wars has ours. George Lucas managed to not only create a movie, but created a whole new universe with its own history, which resulted in more fan involvement than any other movie franchise in history. Although I was not born until about 30 years after the first Star Wars was released, when I saw it it was as though it had just been released. Star Wars has managed to keep its steam throughout all these years and generation after generation continues to watch it.

Today’s infographic provides us with an up and down layout providing 19 different little known facts about Star Wars. As many of you may already know, James Earl Jones provided the voice for Darth Vader and Sebastian Shaw provided his face. However, did you know that there was a third actor involved in the creation of Darth Vader? David Prowse provided the massive body for the character. Another fun fact, the Ewoks were in fact named after the Native American tribe, Miwok, who lived in the Redwood forest in which the Endor scenes were filmed.

Source.

Hexagonall – Harry Postters

19 Jul







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Michael Hefner – Disney Movie Posters

13 Jul

More here:

Remie Geoffroi – Film Actor Portraits

7 Jul
Tim Burton Film Characters

Martin Scorsese Film Characters

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The 7 Best Viral Marketing Campaigns in Movie History

5 Jul

‘Super 8’ hits theaters June 10, and the viral marketing campaigns for it have been spinning like mad. Director J.J. Abrams loves a good viral campaign and is probably one of the few directors who actually thinks about it as he’s constructing the initial movie. The success of ‘Super 8”s marketing remains to be seen, but there are plenty of online hints and movie references that nerds (ourselves included) will be digging through for months.

‘Super 8’ already has intrigue and mystery down, which you’ll see are two big factors in a successful online promotion. Below, we take a look at the seven best viral marketing campaigns in movie history.

7. ‘Snakes on a Plane’ (2006)

Some consider ‘Snakes on a Plane’ a disappointment at the box office. However, the movie grossed over $62m. That is staggering considering almost every person who paid to see it, did so “ironically.” The movie became a hit simply because of its name making the rounds online. New Line already had a Internet phenomenon before they even started marketing it, proving names do matter.


6. ‘Inception’ (2010)

After Christopher Nolan’s ‘The Dark Knight’ enjoyed overwhelming success — due in some part to its viral campaign — it stood to reason the progressive director would want the same for ‘Inception.’ Keeping most of the film under wraps, the stealth marketing team put together the ‘Mind Crime’ virtual game online and produced a series of “real” interviews with scientists who specialize in dreams. Fans were already interested, but these efforts pushed their intrigue past the tipping point.


5. ‘Paranormal Activity’ (2009)

Made for a mere $15,000, ‘Paranormal Activity’ grossed over $193 million. The filmmakers owe a lot of their success to hitting the social networks hard, especially Twitter. After the film’s limited release, they encouraged viewers to “Tweet Their Screams” and write 140-character-long reviews. After Paramount saw the online interest, the studio announced they’d launch it nationally if the movie received one million “demands” on Eventful. They made people work for it and, therefore, gave them a vested interest before even seeing it.


4. ‘Cloverfield’ (2008)

Director J.J. Abrams already had experience with viral marketing from his TV show ‘Lost,’ which had ‘The Lost Experience’ online. The studio used similar online tie-ins for ‘Cloverfield.’ However, wanting to keep the film as much of a secret from scoopers as possible, they misdirected information online, calling the movie ‘Slusho’ and ‘Colossus,’ despite already knowing the title. Fans started looking for hints everywhere before ‘Cloverfield’ was even close to theaters.


3. ‘The Dark Knight’ (2008)

Like ‘Cloverfield,’ ‘The Dark Knight’ used misdirection. One of the first marketing stunts was a fake website for Harvey Dent’s campaign for district attorney, complete with shareable “I Believe in Harvey Dent” political posters. The posters slowly changed to an image of the Joker with the text, “see you in December.” The final push launched WhySoSerious.com, which revealed more images of the Joker as well as the first teaser trailer, helping the film gross more than $1 billion.


2. ‘Toy Story 3’ (2010)

Instead of using misdirection to provoke interest, ‘Toy Story 3’ launched a unique viral video campaign with fake, vintage ’80s commercials for the toy Lots o’ Huggin Bear; Internet-only videos like one with Woody and Buzz on an IM chat; and hilarious ’70s-themed interviews with the Ken doll called ‘Groovin’ With Ken’; as well as his advice series ‘Ken’s Dating Tips.’ All of this excess creative content, as well as a Facebook application that allowed fans to purchase advance tickets through the site and update their friends when doing so, pushed the Pixar flick past $1 billion in sales.


1. ‘The Blair Witch Project’ (1999)

Before YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, MySpace and even Friendster, ‘The Blair Witch Project’ set the standard for guerilla marketing done virally. Shot on a shoestring budget at a time when fake documentaries weren’t commonplace, the film gave the impression this was real, actual “found footage.” The filmmakers and Artisan Entertainment supported that by building a website that backed this claim; they also circulated the rumors via online message boards. The film terrified audiences all the more when, in the back of their heads, they thought it might just be real.

Source.

Zoran Lucić – Posters (various)

30 Jun





























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How Movie Marketers Are Innovating On Facebook

28 Jun

Early on in Facebook marketing history, movies had a minimal presence on the platform. Usually, film pages listed rudimentary information. Sometimes a marketer would create pages for individual characters in a movie, but that’s about as innovative as it got.

Since then, however, the platform has grown into an important tool for connecting with movie fans before and after a premiere.

“Now when we market on Facebook, it’s a full relationship with the fan group,” says Relativity Media president of marketing Terry Curtin. “If you think about the way that movie marketing has worked, for years and years and years we’ve had an indirect relationship with our audience. We sell our tickets through a third party, we advertise through a third party. So this is the first time that we have a direct interface.”

Movie studios use Facebook Pages to listen to movie fans, engage superfans who crave more information than can be crammed into trailers and spread the word about a movie in an organic way.

In the process, many have expanded well beyond a Facebook wall — they’re transformed Facebook into a movie-viewing experience for the fans who want that. Here are some examples of how the makers of a handful of recent and upcoming movies are using the platform.

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See for example: Cars 2 on facebook.